The Virgin Stove

Making everything for the first time

Tag Archives: bell peppers

Veggie Pita Bread Pizza

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This was inspired by Subway’s flatizza. Besides, someone has to use the pita bread that we have sitting in the fridge after I got over my fish taco phase.

My husband loves this dish. He asks me to make it often and I’m happy to oblige because it’s (1) easy, (2) quick, and (3) quite healthy even with the cheese. I do try to cut down on the cheese by putting much less on “my half” of the pizza. This has almost all of my favorite vegetables, which makes me very happy. 🙂

You can modify this recipe according to your preference — change the vegetables or add some meats like ham, pepperoni or crispy bacon bits.

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I do need to mention the pizza stone. I bought this for baking bread but I also noticed that this pita pizza is a lot crispier and better if I use the stone over a regular pan. But the stone is not a must have, a regular pan is fine.

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Stuffed Pepper Three Ways

Basti, our white long-haired chi, has a very bad habit. Whenever we cook, he always thinks that he’s getting fed. So he whimpers and begs… loudly. You’ll be surprised how loud a three-pound chihuahua can sound when he’s upset. We’re still in the process of correcting him and teaching him that dog food is for dogs and human food is for humans only. It’s not as if they have bad food — I buy big bags of organic Grade A dog food for them. Our older dogs still get excited when I cook but at least they don’t beg.

One of the dishes that can drive Basti nuts is stuffed pepper. We have a couple of big bell plants in our little garden and I had to think of creative ways to use them. I started with the most basic one: a soft bell stuffed with a blend of meat, rice and herbs.

I made three versions: the Classic American, the Asian, and the Asian-American.

The Classic American is mainly beef and rice enhanced with sage and parsley and is baked on a bed of Italian tomato sauce.

The Asian-American is similar to the above but with slight differences. Like adding cayenne, substituting Worcestershire with oyster sauce, and using plain crushed tomatoes instead of sauce.

The Asian is quite different. Pork is used instead of beef and rice is served on the side. Among other things.

See the recipes after the jump.

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Teriyaki Salmon with Cheesy Peppers

For some reason, I thought I already posted a teriyaki salmon recipe. And then I remembered that I haven’t even made one yet. Doh, Steffi.

The recipe is really very simple. I remember a baby back ribs recipe I found online that made use of commercially-produced barbecue sauce. Although some criticized the cook’s decision to not use homemade sauce, the poster firmly stressed that if the barbecue sauce is well made, then there shouldn’t be any reason to not use it. Which is exactly why I used store-bought teriyaki marinade.

We swear by World Harbors Maui Mountain Teriyaki marinade. C and I have used this for a lot of other dishes and it is really good with salmon. As for the salmon itself, I cooked it the same way I cooked the trout: by braising. I tried simply searing salmon and baking it in the past. But braising locks in the moisture and you can check it often to see if it’s cooked. It also takes a lot less time than baking.

Instead of picking up the usual large bell peppers, I got a bag of cute little ones in ShopRite. I like it so much more than the big ones. There are no or very little seeds and you can stuff it with all sorts of filling. In this case, I used mozzarella cheese as the peppers would only serve as a side dish to the already sizeable salmon. Velveeta is also an excellent alternative.

Served with our favorite merlot of the moment — Vendange — the meal was absolutely perfect. At least according to my husband. He’s being really nice; it’s our half-year wedding anniversary after all. 🙂

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